Incoming stat…

Where is the money [spent on health care] going? According to Paul Krugman, a lot of it goes to overhead. A recent study found that private insurance companies spend 11.7 cents of every health care dollar on administrative costs, mainly advertising and underwriting, compared with 3.6 cents for Medicare and 1.3 cents for Canada’s government-run system. Also, our system is very generous to drug companies and other medical suppliers, because — unlike other countries’ systems — it doesn’t bargain for lower prices.

Krugman indicates he will talk more about alternatives for health care in future columns so keep an eye out…

Health of Nations

04. February 2004 · Categories: Social/Culture · Tags:

quick overall reference to causes of death world-wide. The terrorist threat, which the Bush administration insists is our greatest threat is actually too small to even show on this graph, so I had to toss it into the bigger bucket of famines, wars, violence and aging, which STILL doesn’t exceed some of the other threats they prefer to ignore.

04. February 2004 · Categories: Politics · Tags:

The race for the democrat ticket is getting interesting now. I kinda get the feeling that this is the closest we will ever get to having a choice. The elections in November will be stuck in that bi-polar lockup. That conversation I told you about in my last post was started by one of the conservatives having emailed a link to an AOL survey for testing your political alignment. You answer about three pages of questions, and then get a result; a list of presidential candidates. Each candidate is presented, showing a percentage of matches between their answers and yours.

I think it’s an easy tool for anyone to sort out which of the choices makes the most sense according to your own positions on issues…



I know, I can’t believe I said that either, but for as much as I can gauge from campaign issues, the test *did* present me with a new perspective on the race. The test then allows you to compare the candidates, showing all their answers.

… I printed out the web pages and marked them all up with a red pen while watching the primaries on TV.

Just for fun, I took the test again and left all the default answers (no opinion) and guess who matched my answers by 100% according to the survey..?

Actually, in all fairness to Slugger, I have to say all the rest of the democrats also matched 100% with my “default”, “no opinion” answers… Bush was the only one who didn’t agree with having no opinions… Either that or there’s some kind of defect in the system – I hope the survey isn’t using the new voting booth technology.

Apple and Pepsi got a deal going where Pepsi drinkers may find codes in their Pepsi bottles for a free song download from the iTunes Music Store. Apple and Pepsi will be giving away 100 million songs during this promo zap, obviously aimed at the lucrative teenage music collectors. Pepsi kicked off it’s multimillion dollar ad campaign last super-bowl Sunday.

You may have noticed, there’s also a big deal going on in L.A. where lawyers from the entertainment industry are getting ready to rumble with the attorneys for Grokster and StreamCast in front of a three judge panel from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

Interesting. The super-bowl Pepsi ad actually featured 20 teens who were sued by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) for downloading music. I understand that these kids can pass around a lot of burn, but they spend their money too. I’m sure there are more kids buying CD’s than ever before and I bet most of them are downloading and burning too. I just can’t see how an entertainment industry, fat enough to spend millions on all these second rate artists, can slap 14 year old kids with $3,000 lawsuits. It’s kinda like the big school yard bully pushing around a little girl.

And like hell, ‘they’re loosing money’. What they’re loosing is ‘potential money’. Let’s at least get that straight.

So the recording industry needs to turn the peer-to-peer networks into an advantage. So lawsuits, lobbies and deals. Now we have 99 cent downloads for individual songs. Everyone wins, which is a good thing considering the inevitability of it all. This is the future of marketing. Sell lots and lots of cheap things. This is the way producers will continue to harvest money even after the middle-class has sunken to the lower rungs of jobless despair. When many of these teenagers get older and hungry it will be impossible to get $20 out of them, but you just may be able to suck out 99 cents, not a bad deal for an industry already switching out it’s tackle for smaller fish in much, larger quantities.

Apple-Pepsi Deal

Wired News on the P2P Case